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Joint project "Heat utilisation with solid sorption technology"

 

The aim of this joint project is to identify application scenarios for thermally driven heat pumps for heating and cooling in Switzerland. It will also develop heat pump technology with minimal electricity requirements designed for these scenarios, and analyse the impact of the technology on the energy landscape of Switzerland, including a sustainability assessment and benchmarking.

Project description (ongoing research project)

There is a need to lower CO2 emissions by substituting fossil fuels with readily available waste heat and renewable energy. Where the use of fossil fuels is unavoidable, it is desirable to maximise its utilisation. On the other hand, the management of electricity grids is more challenging in view of the variability of heating and cooling demand, exacerbated by increased integration of intermittent renewable energy sources. Thus, there is a strong interest to shift heating and cooling loads from electricity grids to thermal networks.

Aim

This joint project aims to substitute electricity and fossil fuels used for cooling and heating of buildings with low-grade waste heat from industrial processes and thermal energy from cogeneration, and from renewables. The key enabling technology is a thermally driven sorption heat pump that provides heating and cooling. The main objectives are:

  • To identify application scenarios for thermally driven heat pumps in Switzerland for heating and cooling
  • To develop thermally driven heat pump technology with minimal electricity requirements designed for the above scenarios
  • To analyse the technology impact on the energy landscape of Switzerland, including a sustainability assessment and benchmarking against alternative technologies

Heating and cooling scenarios are to be analysed together with industry partners who will provide data relating to supply and demand patterns for district energy systems, households and services. Together with materials suppliers and manufacturers, a compact heat pump unit based on solid sorption (adsorption) technology with a rated capacity of 10 kW for cooling and 30 kW for heating is to be developed and built. This joint project addresses a broad target audience: Utilities, industrial and household consumers as well as manufacturers of heat pumps.

Relevance

This joint project will make multiple contributions towards the realisation of "Energy Strategy 2050":

  • Improved energy efficiency by exploiting waste or renewable heat, as well as maximising the utilisation of traditional fuels.
  • Integration of renewables through usage of heat from solar thermal collectors, biomass combustion, cogeneration and waste incineration.
  • Reduction of fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions through substitution with alternative thermal energy sources.
  • Reduction of electricity consumption for heating and cooling applications.

Original title

THRIVE: Thermally driven adsorption heat pumps for substitution of electricity and fossil fuels

Principal Investigators

Leaders of the joint project

  • Dr. Bruno Michel, IBM Research GmbH, Rüschlikon; Dr. Elimar Frank, Hochschule für Technik, Rapperswil

Deputy leader of the joint project

  • Dr. Patrick Ruch, IBM Research GmbH, Rüschlikon

Sub-projects

The joint project consists of five research projects

THRIVE: Tailored materials for high-performance adsorption heat pumps

  • Dr. Matthias Koebel, Departement Bau- und Maschineningenieurwesen, EMPA Dübendorf; Dr. Bruno Michel, Prof. André R.Studart, Prof. Stéphane Citherlet

THRIVE: Materials assembly for high transport rates in adsorber heat exchangers

  • Prof. André R. Studart, Departement Materialwissenschaft, ETH Zürich; Dr. Dominique Derome, Dr. Matthias Koebel, Dr. Bruno Michel

THRIVE: Development of an adsorption heat pump - Component characterization and integration in compact device

  • Prof. Andreas Häberle, Institut für Solartechnik, Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil; Dr. Matthias Koebel, Dr. Bruno Michel, Prof. André R.Studart, Prof. Stéphane Citherlet

THRIVE: Thermally driven adsorption heat pumps for substitution of electricity and fossil fuels: tests, simulation and validation of applications

  • Prof. Stéphane Citherlet, Laboratoire d'énergétique solaire et de physique du bâtiment, HEIG-VD Yverdon; Dr. Peter Burgherr, Dr. Bruno Michel

THRIVE: Sustainability analysis of thermally driven heat conversion in Switzerland

  • Dr. Peter Burgherr, Laboratory for Energy Systems Analysis, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen; Prof. Stéphane Citherlet

 

 

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